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Reich Communications, Inc.

  • Reich Communications, Inc. is a boutique public relations agency in New York City offering full service in a variety of areas, with specializations in business-to-business; advertising, marketing and media firms; transportation safety; non-profits, and select consumer products and services. For more info, visit www.reichcommunications.com or call us at (212) 573-6000. We are located at Suite 11 South, 228 East 45th Street, New York City 10017

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    « Citizen Journalists: The Mumbai Experience | Main | Social Media -- Link between journalists and marketers continues to grow »

    December 11, 2008

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    Comments

    Jeanne Byington

    Wow, David, reading this triggered so many thoughts. First, I think what happened to me might answer why Neel took the bashing. I represented an industry association and reported to a committee and at a committee meeting, was attacked by one new member, as I have never been for any reason in my professional or personal life before or since. One thing stopped me from walking out calmly as you did with your boss: I worked for an agency and it wasn't my client to loose. Neel represents more than himself in his role.

    I agree that this sort of attack and communication is becoming acceptable and I hate that. When there’s a problem or a mistake, I’ve noticed that the way to solve or correct it is to calmly address and then fix it. Start yelling and screaming about it and the person you attack most often shuts down. [I’ve wondered if the blood vessels in a brain actually constricts when you’re being attacked.] The result: You do the project and the fix a disservice.

    With a nod to Hamlet, “The lady doth protest too much, methinks.” Had the folks who voted on the bailout put in appropriate restrictions and oversight systems, they wouldn’t have to yell about the fallout of their sloppy work.

    If someone they respected or feared were on the stand, would they have conducted themselves like buffoon wrestlers? More to the point: What happened to dignity?

    David Reich

    Good point, Jeanne, about Neel representing a larger entity, and not himself. Had he walked out, hopefully his boss would have supported him. Oh wait, it's Washington we're talking about.

    Cam Beck

    Well, David, with the margin of error outpacing Congressional approval rating, it may appear that rudeness is not good marketing.

    With a 90%+ incumbency retention rate, though, we might come to the opposite conclusion.

    However, we've got to be careful in the conclusions we draw from such things, one way or the other, about marketing.

    The dynamics that fuel approval ratings and election prospects are entirely different, and our perceived stake in the outcome of a national issue (where we judge the entire congress, not just our representative) may not be the same as our perceived stake in the local things that, as constituents of a particular district, our representatives may behave in ways more acceptable to us.

    Cam Beck

    Well, David, with the margin of error outpacing Congressional approval rating, it may appear that rudeness is not good marketing.

    With a 90%+ incumbency retention rate, though, we might come to the opposite conclusion.

    However, we've got to be careful in the conclusions we draw from such things, one way or the other, about marketing.

    The dynamics that fuel approval ratings and election prospects are entirely different, and our perceived stake in the outcome of a national issue (where we judge the entire congress, not just our representative) may not be the same as our perceived stake in the local things that, as constituents of a particular district, our representatives may behave in ways more acceptable to us.

    Charles Sipe

    We often put up with rudeness in our politicians, store employees, and fellow drivers because we are so used to it. In some parts of the country rudeness is even expected. I'm glad you are standing up to rudeness, because there is no reason that our culture should be so permissive to being treated poorly.

    Paul

    Nice post David! I too am amazed at the level of rudeness on C-SPAN sometimes - but it does make dam good TV. To be honest though (and I watch C-SPAN like other people watch CNN), it is possibly the best news source to figure out exactly what is going on. The witnesses they call are generally very well informed, and if left to talk, do a far better job explaining complex government issues than the general media does. A FAR better job.

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